News Articles
RSS-2.0RSS-2.0

14/07/2011

 

 Analysts still cautious on city property market
Residential buildings in Tung ChungAnalysts from Jones LangLaSalle expect the sales volume of homes to remain low in HongKongJerome Favre / Bloomberg
Analysts still cautious on city property market
Analysts still cautious on city property market
Analysts still cautious on city property market
Sales to remain low for rest of the yearJones Lang LaSalle
Analysts remain cautious on the outlook for the Hong Kong residential property market afterprices soared more than 70 percent since the beginning of 2009 to record levels.
"We do see some rising (propertymarket risks though they have yet to reach hazardouslevels," said Joseph Tsangmanaging director of Jones Lang LaSalle Hong Kong.
"In view of the higher down-payments now required for home transactions as well as thegrowing uncertainties in policy and macroeconomic riskswe expect sales volume to remain lowfor the rest of the year," Tsang said at a media briefing on Wednesday.
The Hong Kong government has imposed a series of austerity measures in the past 12 monthsin a bid to cool the overheating residential property market as the city's home prices havesurpassed the previous peak of 1997.
During the first half of 2011, a total of 55,200 home transactions were recorded in Hong Kong -a 16 percent drop from a year earlierwhich shows the combined impact from theimplementation of the special stamp duty and the higher down-payment ratio set for potentialbuyerssaid the real estate broker.
Luxury home sales also moderated in the first half after the government lifted their loanthresholdleading the volume of property sales at HK$20 million or above to decrease by 33percent during the period.
Howeverthe home prices of mass market residential properties and luxury properties haveincreased by another 10.1 percent and 16.2 percent during the first six months of 2011,respectivelydue to rising household incomesthe low interest rate environment as well as tighthome supply in the marketaccording to Jones Lang LaSalle.
Though the higher loan-to-value ratio restrictions introduced by the government has led to acomparatively quiet sales market and some local banks have started edging up interest ratesfor new mortgage loansTsang said he did not see a home prices slump in mass marketresidential sales.
HoweverFrancis CheungCLSA head of China-Hong Kong strategyon Wednesday forecastthat the city's home prices will drop by 10 to 20 percent due to "external factors and likelysustained low transaction volume".
As early as AprilBarclays Capital Asia Ltd released a report warning that the city's homeprices are likely to fall as much as 30 percent due to mortgage rate hikes.
"While we do not expect a near-term correctionrising mortgage rates hold the potential for aprice correction into 2012, driven by reduced affordability and purchasing power for newbuyers," Andrew Lawrence and Jonathan Hsuanalysts at Barclayswrote in the report.
In late JuneWalter Kwokthe former chairman of Sun Hung Kai Properties Ltdthe world'sbiggest developer by market valuealso forecast that Hong Kong's property prices will fall asmuch as 15 percent by the end of 2012 as the market had peaked.
Holding a relatively more positive view howeverSimon Loexecutive director of research andadvisory at Colliers International Asiatold China Daily that he anticipates the growth ofresidential prices in Hong Kong to slow to only 5 percent year-on-year in the next 12 months,down from the 15 to 20 percent growth rate seen in the past two years.
"Key reasons are the anticipated rise in mortgage rates and the banksconservative mortgagelending policy in terms of property valuation and loan-to-value ratios," said Lo.
"Mortgage rates have risen by more than 150 basis points from its low point in the fourthquarter last yearHowevergiven the prevailing negative interest rate environmentresidentialprices are unlikely to stage a major downturn at least in the next two quarters," Lo added.
litao@chinadailyhk.com
China Daily

SOURCE BY: CHINA DAILY



Bookmark and Share

Back